Can Brain Changes Reflected by Alterations in Functional Connectivity be a Useful for Outcome Prediction in the Prodromal Stage?

Research Paper Title

Brain functional connectivity data enhance prediction of clinical outcome in youth at risk for psychosis.

Background

The first episode of psychosis is typically preceded by a prodromal phase with subthreshold symptoms and functional decline.

Improved outcome prediction in this stage is needed to allow targeted early intervention.

This study assesses a combined clinical and resting-state fMRI prediction model in 137 adolescents and young adults at Clinical High Risk (CHR) for psychosis from the Shanghai At Risk for Psychosis (SHARP) programme.

Methods

Based on outcome at one-year follow-up, participants were separated into three outcome categories including:

  • Good outcome (symptom remission, N = 71);
  • Intermediate outcome (ongoing CHR symptoms, N = 30); and
  • Poor outcome (conversion to psychosis or treatment-refractory, N = 36).

Validated clinical predictors from the psychosis-risk calculator were combined with measures of resting-state functional connectivity.

Results

Using multinomial logistic regression analysis and leave-one-out cross-validation, a clinical-only prediction model did not achieve a significant level of outcome prediction (F1 = 0.32, p = .154).

An imaging-only model yielded a significant prediction model (F1 = 0.41, p = .016), but a combined model including both clinical and connectivity measures showed the best performance (F1 = 0.46, p < .001).

Influential predictors in this model included functional decline, verbal learning performance, a family history of psychosis, default-mode and frontoparietal within-network connectivity, and between-network connectivity among language, salience, dorsal attention, sensorimotor, and cerebellar networks.

Conclusions

These findings suggest that brain changes reflected by alterations in functional connectivity may be useful for outcome prediction in the prodromal stage.

Reference

Collin, G., Nieto-Castanon, A., Shenton, M.E., Pasternak, O., Kelly, S., Keshavan, M.S., Seidman, L.J., McCarley, R.W., Niznikiewicz, M.A., Li, H., Zhang, T., Tang, Y., Stone, W.S., Wang, J. & Whitfield-Gabrieli, S. (2019) Brain functional connectivity data enhance prediction of clinical outcome in youth at risk for psychosis. NeuroImage Clinical. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2019.102108. [Epub ahead of print].

One thought on “Can Brain Changes Reflected by Alterations in Functional Connectivity be a Useful for Outcome Prediction in the Prodromal Stage?

  1. Hey

    I’m not a doctor and maybe what I am going to write it is completely out of contest but I Just went thru your article And it is my understanding that following a series of exercises and putting your brain out of the “comfort zone” forcing the brain to think what to do next, Automatically The neuropath will become stronger making the individual a more prompt and focus human being,

    Like

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