What is Tranylcypromine/Trifluoperazine?

Introduction

Tranylcypromine/trifluoperazine (brand names Parstelin, Parmodalin, Jatrosom N, Stelapar) is a combination formulation of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressant drug tranylcypromine and the typical antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine that has been used in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

It contains 10 mg tranylcypromine and 1 mg trifluoperazine.

The drug has been in clinical use since at least 1961. It is still available in Italy with the name of Parmodalin.

What is Trifluoperazine?

Introduction

Trifluoperazine, sold under a number of brand names, is a typical antipsychotic primarily used to treat schizophrenia.

It may also be used short term in those with generalised anxiety disorder but is less preferred to benzodiazepines. It is of the phenothiazine chemical class.

Medical Uses

Schizophrenia

Trifluoperazine is an effective antipsychotic for people with schizophrenia. There is low-quality evidence that trifluoperazine increases the chance of being improved when compared to placebo when people are followed up for 19 weeks. There is low-quality evidence that trifluoperazine reduces the risk of relapse when compared with placebo when people are followed for 5 months. As of 2014 there was no good evidence for a difference between trifluoperazine and placebo with respect to the risk of experiencing intensified symptoms over a 16-week period nor in reducing significant agitation or distress.

There is no good evidence that trifluoperazine is more effective for schizophrenia than lower-potency antipsychotics like chlorpromazine, chlorprothixene, thioridazine and levomepromazine, but trifluoperazine appears to cause more adverse effects than these drugs.

Other

It appears to be effective for people with generalised anxiety disorder but the benefit-risk ratio was unclear as of 2005.

It has been experimentally used as a drug to kill eukaryotic pathogens in humans.

Side Effects

Its use in many parts of the world has declined because of highly frequent and severe early and late tardive dyskinesia, a type of extrapyramidal symptom. The annual development rate of tardive dyskinesia may be as high as 4%.

A 2004 meta-analysis of the studies on trifluoperazine found that it is more likely than placebo to cause extrapyramidal side effects such as akathisia, dystonia, and Parkinsonism. It is also more likely to cause somnolence and anticholinergic side effects such as red eye and xerostomia (dry mouth). All antipsychotics can cause the rare and sometimes fatal neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Trifluoperazine can lower the seizure threshold. The antimuscarinic action of trifluoperazine can cause excessive dilation of the pupils (mydriasis), which increases the chances of patients with hyperopia developing glaucoma.

Contraindications

Trifluoperazine is contraindicated in CNS depression, coma, and blood dyscrasias. Trifluoperazine should be used with caution in patients suffering from renal or hepatic impairment.

Mechanism of Action

Trifluoperazine has central antiadrenergic, antidopaminergic, and minimal anticholinergic effects. It is believed to work by blockading dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in the mesocortical and mesolimbic pathways, relieving or minimising such symptoms of schizophrenia as hallucinations, delusions, and disorganised thought and speech.

Names

Brand names include Eskazinyl, Eskazine, Jatroneural, Modalina, Stelazine, Stilizan, Terfluzine, Trifluoperaz, Triftazin.

In the United Kingdom and some other countries, trifluoperazine is sold and marketed under the brand ‘Stelazine’.

The drug is sold as tablet, liquid and ‘Trifluoperazine-injectable USP’ for deep intramuscular short-term use. GP studying pharmacological data has indicated cases of neck vertebrae irreversible fusing leading to NHS preparations being predominantly of the liquid form trifluoperazine as opposed to the tablet form as in Stela zine etc.

In the past, trifluoperazine was used in fixed combinations with the MAO inhibitor (antidepressant) tranylcypromine (tranylcypromine/trifluoperazine) to attenuate the strong stimulating effects of this antidepressant. This combination was sold under the brand name Jatrosom N. Likewise a combination with amobarbital (potent sedative/hypnotic agent) for the amelioration of psychoneurosis and insomnia existed under the brand name Jalonac. In Italy the first combination is still available, sold under the brand name Parmodalin (10 mg of tranylcypromine and 1 mg of trifluoperazine).