Book: An Introduction to Child and Adolescent Mental Health

Book Title:

An Introduction to Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

Author(s): Maddie Burton, Erica Pavord, and Briony Williams.

Year: 2014.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: SAGE Publications.

Type(s): Hardcover, Paperback, and Kindle.

Synopsis:

Anyone who works within children and adolescent mental health services will tell you what a challenging and complex world it is. To help prepare you, the authors have produced a clear introduction to child and adolescent mental health that takes you step-by-step on a journey through the subject. Beginning with the foundations, the book explores the common mental health concepts and influences that you can expect to encounter examining topics like the difference between emotional and mental health issues and how mental health problems develop.

Book: Never Let Go: How to Parent Your Child Through Mental Illness

Book Title:

Never Let Go: How to Parent Your Child Through Mental Illness.

Author(s): Suzanne Alderson.

Year: 2020.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: Vermilion.

Type(s): Paperback, Audiobook, and Kindle.

Synopsis:

How to help your child with mental illness through partnering, not parenting.

Never Let Go is a supportive and practical guide for parents looking after a child with a mental illness. Suzanne Alderson understands the agonising struggle of bringing a child back from the brink of suicide, having spent three years supporting her own daughter through recovery. Her method of ‘partnering, not parenting’ has now helped thousands of other parents through her charity, Parenting Mental Health.

Combining Suzanne’s honest personal experience with expert input from psychologists, this book provides parents with the methods and knowledge they need to support, shield and strengthen their child as they progress towards recovery. Chapters include a background to the mental health epidemic, why a new method of parenting is crucial, how to change your thinking about mental health and practical advice on solutions to daily problems including accepting the new normal, dealing with others, and looking after yourself as well as your child.

Social Support & Mental Health Needs: Carers of Those with Intellectual Disabilities

Research Paper Title

Effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the mental health of carers of people with intellectual disabilities.

Background

The measures implemented to manage the COVID-19 pandemic have been shown to impair mental health. This problem is likely to be exacerbated for carers.

Methods

Informal carers (mainly parents) of children and adults with intellectual disabilities, and a comparison group of parents of children without disabilities, completed an online questionnaire. Almost all the data were collected while strict lockdown conditions were in place.

Results

Relative to carers of children without intellectual disability, carers of both children and adults with intellectual disability had significantly greater levels of a wish fulfilment coping style, defeat/entrapment, anxiety, and depression. Differences were 2-3 times greater than reported in earlier pre-pandemic studies. Positive correlations were found between objective stress scores and all mental health outcomes.

Conclusions

Despite their greater mental health needs, carers of those with intellectual disability received less social support from a variety of sources. The researchers consider the policy implications of these findings.

Reference

Willner, P., Rose, J., Kroese, B.S., Murphy, G., Langdon, P., Clifford, C., Hutchings, H., Watkins, A., Hiles, S. & Cooper, V. (2020) Effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the mental health of carers of people with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities. doi: 10.1111/jar.12811. Online ahead of print.

Alzheimer’s Disease: Carers and their Mental Health

Research Paper Title

Predictors of mental health problems in formal and informal caregivers of patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

Background

Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with significant mental burden e.g., depression and anxiety, and difficulties with social, familial, and professional functioning. To date, few studies have examined variables which would allow for a comprehensive and detailed study of the relationship between personal resources and caregiver health status, with a majority of studies focusing on factors that contribute to increased caregiver’s burden. Moreover, the available evidence fails to address differences in the functioning of formal and informal carers. Paying proper attention to the problems of nursing home staff can help identify important risk factors. Therefore, this study compared mental health problems in informal and formal caregivers and examined the relationship between mental resources and mental health problems in both groups of caregivers.

Methods

This cross-sectional study examined 100 formal (n = 50) and informal (n = 50) caregivers of AD patients. Personal resources were measured with the Social Support Questionnaire (SSQ), the Generalised Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), and the Sense of Coherence Questionnaire (SCQ), while mental health was assessed with the Depression Assessment Questionnaire (DAQ) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Multivariate stepwise regression was performed separately for both investigated groups.

Results

There were no significant differences between informal and formal caregivers in terms of psychological variables, i.e., sense of coherence, social support, self-efficacy, or mental health problems. In contrast, there were different significant predictors of mental health problems in both groups. Comprehensibility (SCQ) was a significant predictor of mental health problems measured by DAQ and self-efficacy (GSES) was a significant predictor of mental health problems measured by GHQ in informal caregivers. For formal caregivers, emotional support (SSQ) and comprehensibility (SCQ) were significant predictors of mental health problems measured by DAQ, while tangible support (SSQ) and meaningfulness (SCQ) were significant predictors of mental health problems measured by GHQ.

Conclusions

Personal resources are significant predictors of mental health outcomes in caregivers of AD patients. Preventive actions should therefore include assessment of factors affecting caregivers’ mental health in order to provide them with necessary care and create appropriate support groups.

Reference

Soltys, A. & Tyburski, E. (2020) Predictors of mental health problems in formal and informal caregivers of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. BMC Psychiatry. 20(1), pp.435. doi: 10.1186/s12888-020-02822-7.

Book: Dementia: Support for Family and Friends

Book Title:

Dementia: Support for Family and Friends

Author(s): Dave Pulsford and Rachel Thompson.

Year: 2019.

Edition: Second (2nd).

Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Type(s): Paperback and Kindle.

Synopsis:

A comprehensive and practical guide to dementia, this book is essential reading for anyone who has a friend or relative with the condition.

This updated edition reflects new guidance on approaches to supporting people with dementia, focussing especially on the UK, and includes quotes from people with dementia as well as from family carers.

The book explores each stage of the journey people with dementia face and explains how it affects the person, as well as those around them both at home and in residential settings.

It shows how best to offer support and where to get professional and informal assistance.

Focussing on the progressive nature of dementia and the issues that can arise as a result, it gives practical advice that can help to ensure the best possible quality of life both for the person with dementia and the people around them.