Book: The ACT Workbook for Depression and Shame

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Book Title:

The ACT Workbook for Depression and Shame: Overcome Thoughts of Defectiveness and Increase Well-Being Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Author(s): Matthew McKay, PhD, Michael Jason Greenberg, PsyD, and Patrick Fanning.

Year: 2020.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: New Harbinger Publications, Workbook Edition.

Type(s): Paperback and Kindle.

Synopsis:

Conquer your self-defeating beliefs and create a more fulfilling life!

Do you feel like you are broken? Are you depressed because you believe that you are somehow defective, unwanted, or inferior? Do you feel self-conscious and insecure, constantly comparing yourself to others? Are you sensitive to criticism, or terrified of rejection?

Feeling flawed and inadequate often stems from negative childhood experiences. If you grew up in a highly critical environment, you might feel unworthy of being loved, or have a deep sense of shame about your perceived defects. You may tell yourself there is something inherently wrong with you that prevents you from forming satisfying relationships, finding happiness, and succeeding in life. So, how can free yourself from the self-defeating beliefs that keep you trapped in the depths of depression?

Grounded in evidence-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), this workbook will give you the tools to identify and dismiss your core beliefs of personal defectiveness, and build a life based on positive choices and values that bring vitality and a sense of personal fulfillment. You will discover ways to develop psychological flexibility, freeing yourself from old habits and unhealthy coping mechanisms, and alleviating symptoms of depression. Finally, you’will learn to see yourself in all your wonderful complexity, with kindness and compassion.

The truth is you are not broken, and painful memories of the past do not have to dictate your future. If you are ready to heal and treat yourself to the care and compassion you deserve, this book will show you how.

Identifying Mental Illness

Mental illness cannot always be clearly differentiated from normal behaviour.

For example, distinguishing normal bereavement from depression may be difficult in people who have had a significant loss, such as the death of a spouse or child, because both involve sadness and a depressed mood.

In the same manner, deciding whether a diagnosis of anxiety disorder applies to people who are worried and stressed about work can be challenging because most people experience these feelings at some time.

The line between having certain personality traits and having a personality disorder can be blurry.

Thus, mental illness and mental health are best thought of as being on a continuum.

Any dividing line is usually based on the following:

  • How severe the symptoms are;
  • How long symptoms last; and
  • How much symptoms affect the ability to function in daily life.