Book: Mindfulness Workbook for Stress Relief

Book Title:

Mindfulness Workbook for Stress Relief: Reduce Stress through Meditation, Non-Judgement, Mind-Body Awareness, and Self-Inquiry.

Author(s): April Snow (LMFT).

Year: 2020.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: Rockridge Press.

Type(s): Kindle.

Synopsis:

Mindfulness is a powerful and proven method for reducing stress and its negative health effects. The Mindfulness Workbook for Stress Relief shows you how to relieve tension and find calm using soothing, restorative techniques like meditation, non-judgement, self-inquiry, and mind-body awareness.

Featuring helpful exercises and simple meditations, this hands-on stress management workbook delivers a wide variety of effective mindfulness tools that you can add to your self-care toolbox like breath awareness, body scans, mindful walking, and more.

The Mindfulness Workbook for Stress Relief includes:

  • Practical & actionable: This book has a beginner-friendly focus that covers a spectrum of everyday situations and science-based solutions.
  • Evidence-based approach: Explore engaging mindfulness-based exercises that are proven to help relieve stress, anxiety, chronic pain, and sleep issues.
  • Situational success: Learn how to address stress triggers in many areas of daily life like relationships, at work, and beyond.

Take a deep breath and begin your practice today with this evidence-based mindfulness workbook.

Book: Everyday Mindfulness for OCD

Book Title:

Everyday Mindfulness for OCD: Tips, Tricks, and Skills for Living Joyfully.

Author(s): Jon Hershfield (MFT) and Shala Nicely (LPC).

Year: 2017.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: New Harbinger.

Type(s): Paperback and Kindle.

Synopsis:

If you have been diagnosed with OCD, you already understand how your obsessive thoughts, compulsive behaviour, and need for rituals can interfere with everyday life. Maybe you have already undergone therapy or are in the midst of working with a therapist. It is important for you to know that life does not end with an OCD diagnosis. In fact, it is possible to not only live with the disorder, but also live joyfully. This practical and accessible guide will show you how.

In Everyday Mindfulness for OCD, you will discover how you can stay one step ahead of your OCD. You will learn about the world of mindfulness, and how living in the present moment non-judgmentally is so important when you have OCD. You will also explore the concept of self-compassion; what it is, what it is not how to use it, and why people with OCD benefit from it. Finally, you will discover daily games, tips, and tricks for outsmarting your OCD, meditations and mindfulness exercises, and much, much more.

Living with OCD is challenging; but it does not have to define you. If you are tired of focusing on how you are living with OCD is and are looking for fun ways to make the most of your unique self, this book will be a breath of fresh air.

Non-Judgemental Listening

Non-judgemental listening involves:

Listening actively by doing all that you can to make sure you understand what the person is saying to you.

Resisting the urge to fix the person’s problems by offering advice.

Putting aside your own feelings and attitudes temporarily, so that you can listen without judging the person.

Accepting the person exactly as they are.

Making no moral judgement about their situation.

Feeling and expressing genuine concern for the person.

How to Listen

To listen and communicate non-judgmentally is one of the five basic steps in mental health first aid. It is a term you will find used throughout the website.

This website cannot train you to be a counsellor or a therapist, but you can develop some basic listening skills that will be useful in many situations.

Are You Really Listening?

Most of the time we do not really listen to what others are saying. This is not because we are being rude or uncaring. Usually when we are in conversation with someone else, we find ourselves going off on other trains of thought because something that has been said has reminded us of other things. Other times we are thinking about our reply and only giving the speaker part of our attention.

When we are listening to the other person, part of our mind is thinking about our own reactions to what they are saying. This is a normal response, and in everyday situations it usually works well.

In a situation where a person is distressed or having a mental health crisis, it is very important to pay more attention and put non-judgemental listening skills into practice.

Being An Effective Listener

While you are paying attention to the feelings of the other person, it is important to be aware of your own feelings and thoughts.

Attending to a person who may be distressed may bring up a number of responses, such as fear, irritation, sadness, or a sense of being overwhelmed.

These are normal responses to a difficult situation. However, it is important that the listener continues to be open to listening respectfully, and attempts to avoid reacting to what is being shared.

That means focusing on the distressed person, and understanding how it feels to be in their place.

This may be difficult, depending on the relationship between the listener and the distressed person. Sometimes it is especially difficult if the person is a close friend or relative. If you feel that your relationship is preventing you from being an effective listener, it may be best to get the help of someone else who is not so close to the person. However, in a crisis you may not have this option.

Remember that during a crisis, you are offering the distressed person a place of safety based on respect. acceptance, and understanding – and you may be saving their life.

After the conversation, you may feel unsettled, shocked, confused, or angry. You may wish to share this with someone, to acknowledge your own experience. In doing so, you should maintain the person’s privacy by withholding their name or any details that could identify them. This is not the same as accessing appropriate assistance for the person if they need it (e.g. if they are suicidal) when you will need to reveal their identity.

Always remember that you are human, and that feeling a mixture of emotions is a normal human response.

First Aid for Mental Health

Mental health first aid (MHFA) is the first step in helping a person experiencing a mental health crisis, and is intended to be used until other help arrives.

Just like physical first aid, the first aim of MHFA is to preserve life.

Evidence shows that many people experiencing a mental health crisis have thoughts of suicide, and some people act on these thoughts. This is why asking about suicide is the first step in offering help.

The current model of MHFA is known by the five-step acronym A.L.G.E.E.

Step 1: Ask About Suicide

This does not mean that you should ask everyone you meet about suicide, regardless of their situation.

What it does mean is that when you suspect that a person may be having suicidal thoughts, because of their level of pain or distress, or because of their situation, or even because you have a gut feeling that they may be considering suicide, you should ask them.

This may seem very challenging and difficult to begin with, but the MHFA course covers the skills and practice that will make this step feel more natural.

Once we are sure that the person is not in immediate danger we can put the next step into practice.

Step 2: Listen and Communicate Non-Judgmentally

People who are feeling distressed or experiencing mental health problems can feel that no one is able to listen to them, or to accept their feelings without judging them as weak or inferior.

Being able to listen to the person, and offering them the simple human kindness of the time to talk about how they feel, can help them realise that they are not alone.

Step 3: Give Reassurance and Information

This is not about offering advice or solving the person’s problems. It is about reassuring them that there is effective help available and that there are things we can do immediately to help the situation.

Step 4: Encourage the Person to get Professional Help

This is essential to their recovery.

Help may be in the form of their general practitioner (GP), other support groups, or therapy.

The help they need will depend on the type of problem(s) they are experiencing.

The MHFA course provides you with the information on where different types of help can be found quickly.

Step 5: Encourage Self-Help Strategies

When a person is experiencing mental health problems, there are things that can be done in the short-term to alleviate their distress.

Similarly, when treatment is underway there are often things a person can do to help recovery.