Book: The Resilience Workbook

Book Title:

The Resilience Workbook – Essential Skills to Recover from Stress, Trauma, and Adversity.

Author(s): Glenn R. Schiraldi (PhD).

Year: 2017.

Edition: First (1st), Illustrated Edition.

Publisher: New Harbinger.

Type(s): Paperback and Kindle.

Synopsis:

What is resilience, and how can you build it? In The Resilience Workbook, Glenn Schiraldi-author of The Self-Esteem Workbook-offers invaluable insight and outlines essential skills to help you bounce back from setbacks and cultivate a growth mindset.

Why do some people sail through life’s storms, while others are knocked down? Resilience is the key. Resilience is the ability to recover from difficult experiences, such as death of loved one, job loss, serious illness, terrorist attacks, or even just daily stressors and challenges. Resilience is the strength of body, mind, and character that enables people to respond well to adversity. In short, resilience is the cornerstone of mental health.

Combining evidence-based approaches including positive psychology, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), mindfulness, and relaxation, The Resilience Workbook will show you how to bounce back and thrive in any difficult situation. You will learn how to harness the power of your brain’s natural neuroplasticity; manage strong, distressing emotions; and improve mood and overall well-being. You will also discover powerful skills to help you prevent and recover from stress-related conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, depression, anger, and substance abuse disorders.

When the going gets tough, you need real, proven-effective skills to manage your stress and heal from setbacks. The comprehensive and practical exercises in this workbook will help you cultivate resilience, stay calm under pressure, and face all of life’s challenges.

What is the Impact of Military Service Exposures & Psychological Resilience on the Mental Health Trajectories of Older Male Veterans?

Research Paper Title

The Impact of Military Service Exposures and Psychological Resilience on the Mental Health Trajectories of Older Male Veterans.

Background

The researchers examine the impact of exposure to the dead, dying, and wounded (DDW) during military service on the later-life depressive symptom trajectories of male United States veterans, using psychological resilience as an internal resource that potentially moderates negative consequences.

Methods

The Health and Retirement Study (2006-2014) and linked Veteran Mail Survey were used to estimate latent growth curve models of depressive symptom trajectories, beginning at respondents’ first report of resilience.

Results

Veterans with higher levels of resilience do not have increased depressive symptoms in later life, despite previous exposure to DDW. Those with lower levels of resilience and previous exposure to DDW experience poorer mental health in later life.

Conclusions

Psychological resilience is important for later-life mental health, particularly for veterans who endured potentially traumatic experiences. The researches discuss the importance acknowledging the role individual resources play in shaping adaptation to adverse life events and implications for mental health service needs.

Reference

Urena, S., Taylor, M.G. & Carr, D.C. (2020) The Impact of Military Service Exposures and Psychological Resilience on the Mental Health Trajectories of Older Male Veterans. Journal of Aging and Health. doi: 10.1177/0898264320975231. Online ahead of print.

Book: Building Resilience In Children And Teens

Book Title:

Building Resilience In Children And Teens: Giving Kids Roots and Wings.

Author(s): Kenneth R. Ginsburg with Martha M. Jablow.

Year: 2014.

Edition: Third (3rd).

Publisher: American Academy of Paediatrics.

Type(s): Paperback, Audiobook, and Kindle.

Synopsis:

This invaluable guide from bestselling author and pediatrican Kenneth Ginsburg, MD, FAAP, offers coping strategies to help children and teens deal with stress due to academic pressure, high achievement standards, media messages, peer pressure, and family tension.

Recommendations guide parents to help kids from the age of 18 months to 18 years build the seven crucial ā€œCā€™sā€ – competence, confidence, connection, character, contribution, coping, and control – needed to bounce back from life’s challenges.

This book provides a wide range of tactics, including building on natural strengths, fostering hope and optimism, avoiding risky behaviours, and taking care of oneself physically and emotionally. This edition includes new chapters on the topic of grit, stress and how how one’s perception of stress affects what stress really is, toxic stress, and the protective role of nurturant adults. It also addresses the issue of adolescents responding to stress by either indulging in unhealthy behaviours or giving up completely, and the suggested solutions are aimed at strengthening resilience.

Is Psychological Resilience Important for Later-Life Mental Health?

Research Paper Title

The Impact of Military Service Exposures and Psychological Resilience on the Mental Health Trajectories of Older Male Veterans.

Background

The researchers examine the impact of exposure to the dead, dying, and wounded (DDW) during military service on the later-life depressive symptom trajectories of male United States veterans, using psychological resilience as an internal resource that potentially moderates negative consequences.

Methods

The Health and Retirement Study (2006-2014) and linked Veteran Mail Survey were used to estimate latent growth curve models of depressive symptom trajectories, beginning at respondents’ first report of resilience.

Results

Veterans with higher levels of resilience do not have increased depressive symptoms in later life, despite previous exposure to DDW. Those with lower levels of resilience and previous exposure to DDW experience poorer mental health in later life.

Conclusions

Psychological resilience is important for later-life mental health, particularly for veterans who endured potentially traumatic experiences. The researchers discuss the importance acknowledging the role individual resources play in shaping adaptation to adverse life events and implications for mental health service needs.

Reference

Urena, S. Taylor, M.G. & Carr, D.C. (2020) The Impact of Military Service Exposures and Psychological Resilience on the Mental Health Trajectories of Older Male Veterans. Journal of Aging and Health. doi: 10.1177/0898264320975231. Online ahead of print.