Book: CBT Toolbox for Children and Adolescents

Book Title:

CBT Toolbox for Children and Adolescents: Over 220 Worksheets & Exercises for Trauma, ADHD, Autism, Anxiety, Depression & Conduct Disorders.

Author(s): Lisa Phifer.

Year: 2017.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: PESI Publishing & Media.

Type(s): Spiral-bound, Paperback and Kindle.

Synopsis:

The CBT Toolbox for Children and Adolescents gives you the resources to help the children in your life handle their daily obstacles with ease. Inside this workbook you’ll find hundreds of worksheets, exercises, and activities to help treat:

  • Trauma.
  • ADHD.
  • Autism.
  • Anxiety.
  • Depression.
  • Conduct Disorders.

Written by clinicians and teachers with decades of experience working with kids, these practical and easy-to-use therapy tools are vital to teaching children how to cope with and overcome their deepest struggles. Step-by-step, you’ll see how the best strategies from cognitive behavioural therapy are adapted for children.

Book: Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR) Therapy: Basic Principles, Protocols, and Procedures

Book Title:

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) Therapy: Basic Principles, Protocols, and Procedures

Author(s): Francine Shapiro.

Year: 2018.

Edition: Third (3rd).

Publisher: Guildford Press.

Type(s): Hardcover and Kindle.

Synopsis:

The authoritative presentation of Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy, this ground-breaking book – now revised and expanded – has enhanced the clinical repertoires of more than 125,000 readers and has been translated into 10 languages. Originally developed for treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this evidence-based approach is now also used to treat adults and children with complex trauma, anxiety disorders, depression, addictive behaviour problems, and other clinical problems. EMDR originator Francine Shapiro reviews the therapy’s theoretical and empirical underpinnings, details the eight phases of treatment, and provides training materials and resources. Vivid vignettes, transcripts, and reproducible forms are included.

New to This Edition

  • Over 15 years of important advances in therapy and research, including findings from clinical and neurophysiological studies.
  • New and revised protocols and procedures.
  • Discusses additional applications, including the treatment of complex trauma, addictions, pain, depression, and moral injury, as well as post-disaster response.
  • Appendices with session transcripts, clinical aids, and tools for assessing treatment fidelity and outcomes.

EMDR therapy is recognised as a best practice for the treatment of PTSD by the US Departments of Veterans Affairs and Defence, the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, the World Health Organisation, the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany, and other health care associations/institutes around the world.

Book: Complex PTSD: From Surviving to Thriving

Book Title:

Complex PTSD: From Surviving to Thriving: A Guide and Map for Recovering from Childhood Trauma.

Author(s): Pete Walker.

Year: 2013.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Type(s): Paperback, Audiobook, and Kindle.

Synopsis:

I have Complex PTSD (CPTSD) and wrote this book from the perspective of someone who has experienced a great reduction of symptoms over the years. I also wrote it from the viewpoint of someone who has discovered many silver linings in the long, windy, bumpy road of recovering from CPTSD. I felt encouraged to write this book because of thousands of e-mail responses to the articles on my website that repeatedly expressed gratitude for the helpfulness of my work. An often echoed comment sounded like this: At last someone gets it. I can see now that I am not bad, defective or crazy…or alone!

The causes of CPTSD range from severe neglect to monstrous abuse. Many survivors grow up in houses that are not homes – in families that are as loveless as orphanages and sometimes as dangerous. If you felt unwanted, unliked, rejected, hated and/or despised for a lengthy portion of your childhood, trauma may be deeply engrained in your mind, soul and body. This book is a practical, user-friendly self-help guide to recovering from the lingering effects of childhood trauma, and to achieving a rich and fulfilling life. It is copiously illustrated with examples of my own and my clients’ journeys of recovering.

This book is also for those who do not have CPTSD but want to understand and help a loved one who does. This book also contains an overview of the tasks of recovering and a great many practical tools and techniques for recovering from childhood trauma. It extensively elaborates on all the recovery concepts explained on my website, and many more. However, unlike the articles on my website, it is oriented toward the layperson. As such, much of the psychological jargon and dense concentration of concepts in the website articles has been replaced with expanded and easier to follow explanations. Moreover, many principles that were only sketched out in the articles are explained in much greater detail.

A great deal of new material is also explored. Key concepts of the book include managing emotional flashbacks, understanding the four different types of trauma survivors, differentiating the outer critic from the inner critic, healing the abandonment depression that come from emotional abandonment and self-abandonment, self-reparenting and reparenting by committee, and deconstructing the hierarchy of self-injuring responses that childhood trauma forces survivors to adopt.

The book also functions as a map to help you understand the somewhat linear progression of recovery, to help you identify what you have already accomplished, and to help you figure out what is best to work on and prioritise now. This in turn also serves to help you identify the signs of your recovery and to develop reasonable expectations about the rate of your recovery. I hope this map will guide you to heal in a way that helps you to become an unflinching source of kindness and self-compassion for yourself, and that out of that journey you will find at least one other human being who will reciprocally love you well enough in that way.

Book: The Complex PTSD Workbook

Book Title:

The Complex PTSD Workbook: A Mind-Body Approach to Regaining Emotional Control and Becoming Whole.

Author(s): Arielle Schwartz.

Year: 2020.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: Sheldon Press.

Type(s): Paperback, Audiobook, and Kindle.

Synopsis:

Those affected by complex PTSD commonly feel as though there is something fundamentally wrong with them – that somewhere inside there is a part of them that needs to be fixed. Though untrue, such beliefs can feel extremely real and frightening. Difficult as it may be, facing one’s PTSD from unresolved childhood trauma is a brave, courageous act – and with the right guidance, healing from PTSD is possible.

Clinical psychologist Dr Arielle Schwartz has spent years helping those with C-PTSD find their way to wholeness. She also knows the territory of the healing firsthand, having walked it herself. This book provides a map to the complicated, and often overwhelming, terrain of C-PTSD with Dr. Schwartz’s knowledgeable guidance helping you find your way.

In The Complex PTSD Workbook, you’ll learn all about C-PTSD and gain valuable insight into the types of symptoms associated with unresolved childhood trauma, while applying a strength-based perspective to integrate positive beliefs and behaviours.

Examples and exercises through which you’ll discover your own instances of trauma through relating to PTSD experiences other than your own, such as the following:

  • Information about common PTSD misdiagnoses such as bipolar disorder, ADHD, anxiety disorders, major depressive disorder, and substance abuse, among others.
  • Explorations of common methods of PTSD therapy including somatic therapy, EMDR, CBT, DBT, and mind-body perspectives.
  • Chapter takeaways that encourage thoughtful consideration and writing to explore how you feel as you review the material presented in relation to your PTSD symptoms.

The Complex PTSD Workbook aims to empower you with a thorough understanding of the psychology and physiology of C-PTSD so you can make informed choices about the path to healing that is right for you and discover a life of wellness, free of C-PTSD, that used to seem just out of reach.

Book: PTSD F*cking Hurts (Write That Sh*t Down)

Book Title:

PTSD Fcking Hurts (Write That Sht Down): A Guided Journal for Depression, PTSD, Mental Recovery, With Prompts to Help you through Emotional Healing, With Prompts and Activities.

Author(s): Sami’s Mental Health Journals.

Year: 2020.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: Independently Published.

Type(s): Paperback.

Synopsis:

A great Guided & Prompted Journal workbook for people suffering from PTSD or Complex PTSD (CPTSD). It is a perfect Journal for yourself if you are seeking a great book to help write down your thoughts. It will guide you throughout activities, Prompts, and questions you need to answer honestly in the journey of recovery, With space for notes.

It will also be a gift for someone who suffers from PTSD, or with having a hard psychologic experience.

Book: The PTSD Workbook

Book Title:

The PTSD Workbook: Simple, Effective Techniques for Overcoming Traumatic Stress Symptoms.

Author(s): Mary Beth Williams and Soili Poijula.

Year: 2016.

Edition: Third (3rd).

Publisher: New Harbinger.

Type(s): Paperback and Kindle.

Synopsis:

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an extremely debilitating condition that can occur after exposure to a terrifying event. But whether you are a veteran of war, a victim of domestic violence or sexual violence, or have been involved in a natural disaster, crime, car accident, or accident in the workplace, your symptoms may be getting in the way of you living your life.

PTSD can often cause you to relive your traumatic experience in the form of flashbacks, memories, nightmares, and frightening thoughts. This is especially true when you are exposed to events or objects that remind you of your trauma. Left untreated, PTSD can lead to emotional numbness, insomnia, addiction, anxiety, depression, and even suicide. So, how can you start to heal and get your life back?

In The PTSD Workbook, Third Edition, psychologists and trauma experts Mary Beth Williams and Soili Poijula outline techniques and interventions used by PTSD experts from around the world to conquer distressing trauma-related symptoms. In this fully revised and updated workbook, you’ll learn how to move past the trauma you’ve experienced and manage symptoms such as insomnia, anxiety, and flashbacks.

Based in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), this book is extremely accessible and easy-to-use, offering evidence-based therapy at a low cost. This new edition features chapters focusing on veterans with PTSD, the link between cortisol and adrenaline and its role in PTSD and overall mental health, and the mind-body component of PTSD. Clinicians will also find important updates reflecting the new DSM-V definition of PTSD.

This book is designed to give you the emotional resilience you need to get your life back together after a traumatic event.

Book: Finding Your Best Self

Book Title:

Finding Your Best Self: Recovery from Addiction, Trauma, or Both.

Author(s): Lisa M. Najavits (PhD).

Year: 2019.

Edition: Second (2nd).

Publisher: Guildford Press.

Type(s): Hardcover, Paperback, and Kindle.

Synopsis:

Addiction and trauma are two of the most common and difficult issues that people face. In this motivating book, leading expert Lisa Najavits explains the link between addiction and trauma and presents science-based self-help strategies that you can use no matter where you are in your recovery. Every chapter features inspiring words from people who have “been there,” plus carefully designed reflection questions, exercises, and other practical tools. Learn how you can:

  • Build coping skills so that the future is better than the past.
  • Keep yourself safe and find support.
  • Set your own goals and make a plan to achieve them at your own pace.
  • Choose compassion over self-blame and shame.
  • Move toward your best self – the person you want to be.

If you are a family member or friend seeking to support a loved one – or a helping professional – this book is also for you. Now in a convenient large-size format, the revised edition features added materials for professional and peer counsellors. First edition title: Recovery from Trauma, Addiction, or Both.

Mental health professionals, see also the author’s Seeking Safety: A Treatment Manual for PTSD and Substance Abuse, which presents an evidence-based treatment approach developed specifically for PTSD and substance abuse.

Book: Neurobiologically Informed Trauma Therapy with Children & Adolescent

Book Title:

Neurobiologically Informed Trauma Therapy with Children and Adolescents: Understanding Mechanisms of Change (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology).

Author(s): Linda Chapman.

Year: 2014.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: W.W. Norton & Company.

Type(s): Paperback and Kindle.

Synopsis:

The model of treatment developed here is grounded in the physical, psychological, and cognitive reactions children have to traumatic experiences and the consequences of those experiences. The approach to treatment utilises the integrative capacity of the brain to create a self, foster insight, and produce change. Treatment strategies are based on cutting-edge understanding of neurobiology, the development of the brain, and the storage and retrieval of traumatic memory. Case vignettes illustrate specific examples of the reactions of children, families, and teens to acute and repeated exposure to traumatic events.

Also presented is the most recent knowledge of the role of the right hemisphere (RH) in development and therapy. Right brain communication, and how to recognise the non-verbal symbolic and unconscious, affective processes will be explained, along with examples of how the therapist can utilise art making, media, tools, and self to engage in a two-person biology. 30 illustrations; 8 pages of colour.

Linking PTSD, Trauma, & ASD

Research Paper Title

Heightened risk of posttraumatic stress disorder in adults with autism spectrum disorder: The role of cumulative trauma and memory deficits.

Background

Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are known to be at increased risk of exposure to traumas such as maltreatment and abuse, however less is known about possible susceptibility towards the development of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and associated risk factors.

This study investigated the rates of trauma exposure and PTSD, and the role of cumulative trauma exposure and memory as risk factors for PTSD in adults who self-reported having received an ASD diagnosis, compared to a typically developing (TD) comparison group.

Methods

Questionnaires assessing self-reported frequency of trauma exposure (LEC), PTSD symptomology (PCL-S) and memory (EMQ- R and BRIEF-A) were completed online by 38 ASD adults and 44 TD adults.

Results

Rates of trauma exposure and PTSD symptomatology were significantly higher in the ASD group, compared to the TD group, with deficits in working memory and everyday memory mediating this association. Interestingly, a cumulative effect of trauma exposure on PTSD symptom severity was only found in the ASD group.

Conclusions

High rates of trauma and probable PTSD in ASD adults highlight the importance of routine screening. Cumulative trauma exposure and memory deficits may act to increase risk of PTSD in ASD; longitudinal research is called for.

Reference

Rumball, F., Brook, L., Happe, F. & Karl, A. (2021) Heightened risk of posttraumatic stress disorder in adults with autism spectrum disorder: The role of cumulative trauma and memory deficits. Research in Developmental Disabilities. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2020.103848. Online ahead of print.

Complementary Medicine & Integrative Health Approaches to Trauma Therapy & Recovery

Research Paper Title

Introduction to the special issue: Complementary medicine and integrative health approaches to trauma therapy and recovery.

Abstract

The popularity of complementary and integrative health (also complementary integrated health; CIH) approaches has significantly increased in recent years.

According to the National Centre for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), part of the National Institutes of Health, about 1 in 3 adults and 1 in 9 children used CIH approaches to healing.

Some reports estimate that the use of CIH approaches will continue to increase (Clarke et al., 2015) as these therapies are cost effective and also due to the difficulties in finding trained mental health professionals (Simon et al., 2020).

For the purpose of this special issue, the researchers use the NCCIH’s definition of CIH as “a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered to be part of conventional medicine” (Barnes et al., 2004, p. v). However, the integration of these therapies into the health system has not followed the same pattern despite the fact that patients report the need to discuss CIH therapies with their doctors or are actually using them (de Jonge et al., 2018; Jou & Johnson, 2016; Stapleton et al., 2015). This inability to keep up with the demand or patients’ preference is possibly due to providers’ lack of understanding and/or knowledge of these therapies, as well as scientific skepticism (Ali & Katz, 2015; Fletcher et al., 2017).

Using data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, Jou & Johnson (2016) identified patterns of CIH use in the United States and reasons for patients’ nondisclosure of the use of these therapies. Patients’ fear of disclosure due to perceived scepticism or disapproval from their provider was frequently attributed as a cause of patients’ nondisclosures to providers about the use of these therapies (Eisenberg et al., 2001; Jou & Johnson, 2016; Thomson et al., 2012).

The arrival of patient-centred care models is beginning to shift the ways we understand the patient’s role in treatment engagement. Patient-centred approaches often emphasize the use of preventative and holistic wellness models that go beyond the use of evidence-based treatments. This approach also seeks to be culturally responsive, which is a key factor in addressing health disparities in the United States (American Psychological Association [APA], 2019).

The Institute of Medicine, in its report on CIH therapies, highlighted the importance of engaging patients in their own care, including having a decision about therapeutic options (Bondurant et al., 2005). Likewise, the Race and Ethnicity Guidelines in Psychology (APA, 2019) recommend psychologists engage the patient’s cultural beliefs, or what Kleinman called the “explanatory belief model” (Kleinman, 1978)- for example, by “aim[ing] to understand and encourage indigenous/ ethnocultural sources of healing within professional practice” (APA, 2019, p. 24).

Reference

Mattar, S. & Frewenm P.A. (2020) Introduction to the special issue: Complementary medicine and integrative health approaches to trauma therapy and recovery. Psychological Trauma. 12(8):821-824. doi: 10.1037/tra0000994.