Dosed (2019)

Introduction

An award-winning documentary film about treating anxiety, depression and addiction with psychedelic medicine.

Outline

After years of prescription medications failed her a suicidal woman, Adrianne, turns to underground healers to try and overcome her depression, anxiety, and opioid addiction with illegal psychedelic medicine like magic mushrooms and iboga.

Production & Filming Details

  • Director(s): Tyler Chandler.
  • Producer(s): Robert J. Barnhart, Tyler Chandler, Jason Hodges, Kelley Hodges, Chris Mayerson, Nicholas Meyers, and Nick Soares.
  • Writer(s): Tyler Chandler, Nicholas Meyers, and Jessie Deeter (Story consultant).
  • Music: Jayme McDonald.
  • Cinematography: Nicholas Meyers.
  • Editor(s): Tyler Chandler and Nicholas Meyers.
  • Production: Golden Teacher Films.
  • Release Date: 20 March 2019 (US).
  • Running Time: 82 minutes.

A New Understanding: The Science of Psilocybin (2015)

Introduction

A New Understanding explores the treatment of end-of-life anxiety in terminally ill cancer patients using psilocybin, a psychoactive compound found in some mushrooms, to facilitate deeply spiritual experiences.

Outline

The documentary explores the confluence of science and spirituality in the first psychedelic research studies since the 1970’s with terminally ill patients.

As a society we devote a great deal of attention to treating cancer, but very little to treating the human being who is dying of cancer. The recent resurgence of psychedelic research is once again revealing the power of compounds like psilocybin to profoundly alter our understanding of both life and death. Through the eyes of patients, their loved ones, therapists, and researchers, A New Understanding examines the use of psilocybin in a controlled setting to reduce psychospiritual anxiety, depression, and physical pain.

The treatment aims to help the patient understand that a ‘good’ death is possible, and to help the patient’s family deal well with the dying process. A New Understanding shows patients and their families coming to terms with dying through the skillful treatment of the whole human being. If we can learn to work more skillfully with dying, we will also learn to take better care of life.

Production & Filming Details

  • Director(s): Roslyn Dauber.
  • Producer(s): Robert J Barnhart, Roslyn Dauber, Brady Dial, Matt Humble, Steve McDonald, Jeff Porter, and Mitch Schultz.
  • Music: Brian Satterwhite.
  • Editor(s): Jason Uson.
  • Studio: Red Phoenix Productions.
  • Production: Golden Teacher Films.
  • Release Date: March 2015 (US).
  • Running Time: 55 minutes.
  • Country: US.
  • Langauge: English.

Patients Dependent on Benzodiazepines: Make Alliances

Research Paper Title

Making Alliances With Patients Dependent on Benzodiazepines: A Provider’s Experience.

Abstract

Tens of millions of benzodiazepine (BZD) prescriptions are written annually for the outpatient management of anxiety disorders and insomnia.

Many prescribers do not follow published treatment guidelines for these disorders.

Psychiatric-mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) regularly meet patients who have been treated with BZDs for years.

The dangers posed by outpatient BZD use are recognised, especially among older adults, and their use should be minimised or eliminated.

There are multiple manualised approaches to outpatient down-titration of BZDs, but little evidence about which methods really work.

To effect change, it is essential that PMHNPs establish a sound therapeutic alliance with these patients, especially by using their skills in therapeutic communication.

One major conflict that may occur early in the relationship is the patient’s expectation that the BZD medication regimen will continue indefinitely and their unwillingness to risk discontinuing the drug.

This conflict commonly raises non-adherence to a down-titration plan or patient termination of the relationship.

It is essential that PMHNPs take the time and patience to build strong therapeutic alliances with patients to design and implement a successful BZD discontinuation regimen.

Reference

Amberg, A. (2020) Making Alliances With Patients Dependent on Benzodiazepines: A Provider’s Experience. Journal of Pyschosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services. 58(1), pp.29-32. doi: 10.3928/02793695-20191218-06.

Benzodiazepines & Older Adults

Research Paper Title

Little Helpers No More: A Framework for Collaborative Deprescribing of Benzodiazepines in Older Adults.

Abstract

Benzodiazepines are a class of medications that tend to fly “under the radar” within the general population but nonetheless post a significant risk to older adults when not used appropriately.

The current article aims to shine a spotlight on this medication class along with a framework for a team-based approach to successfully de-escalate use when clinically appropriate.

Reference

Suss, T. & Oldani, M. (2020) Little Helpers No More: A Framework for Collaborative Deprescribing of Benzodiazepines in Older Adults. Journal of Pyschosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services. 58(1), pp.23-28. doi: 10.3928/02793695-20191218-05.

Utility of Add-on Mirtazapine to Clozapine-Responsive Early-Onset Schizophrenia

Research Paper Title

Add-on mirtazapine to clozapine-responsive early-onset schizophrenia.

Abstract

Early-onset schizophrenia is notorious for poor prognostication and treatment-refractoriness.

Clozapine remains a viable option, albeit off-label, but is clearly underutilised in this population.

Use is typically fraught with panoply of drastic side effects.

Here, the authors report on an adolescent case with schizophrenia that responded ultimately to clozapine.

Add-on mirtazapine was advantageous spanning negative and cognitive symptom domains whilst addressing clozapine-related sialorrhea and urinary incontinence.

This might open new venues for such complicated clinical scenarios.

Reference

Moodliar, S., Naguy, A. & Elsori, D.H. (2019) Add-on mirtazapine to clozapine-responsive early-onset schizophrenia. Psychiatry Research. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2019.112701.

Mental Health Needs & Visits: Rural vs Urban Residents

Research Paper Title

Rural Residents With Mental Health Needs Have Fewer Care Visits Than Urban Counterparts.

Background

Analysis of a nationally representative sample of adults with mental health needs shows that rural residents have fewer ambulatory mental health visits than their urban counterparts do.

Even among people already on prescription medications for mental health conditions, rural-urban differences are large.

Reference

Kirby, J.B., Zuvekas, S.H., Borsky, A.E. & Ngo-Metzger, Q. (2019) Rural Residents With Mental Health Needs Have Fewer Care Visits Than Urban Counterparts. Health Affairs (Project Hope). 38(12), pp.2057-2060. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2019.00369.