Is the Mental Wellbeing of Doctors Becoming an Increasing Concern?

Research Paper Title

Depressive symptoms in residents of a tertiary training hospital in Malaysia: The prevalence and associated factors.

Background

The mental wellbeing of doctors is becoming an increasing concern in the world today.

In Malaysia, residency is a challenging period in a doctor’s life, with many changes professionally and possibly in their personal lives as well.

This study aims to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms and the socio-demographic correlates among residents in a tertiary training hospital in Malaysia.

It is a cross sectional study and all residents were approached to participate in the study.

Methods

The instruments used were a socio-demographic questionnaire and the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9).

Chi-square test was used to explore the association between the socio-demographic correlates, and those that were found to have significant associations were further tested using multivariate logistic regression.

Results

The prevalence of depression among residents was 25.1 %. Longer working hours, missing meals, and working in Department of Surgery and Department of Anaesthesia was significantly positively associated while having protected study time, CME/lectures, leisure/hobbies and exercise were negatively associated with depression.

The Department of Rehabilitation Medicine had a significantly negative association with depression. After logistic regression, longer working hours and a lack of protected study time was significantly associated with depression in the respective departments.

Conclusions

In summary, the prevalence of depression among residents is high and is associated with longer working hours, missing meals and a lack of protected study time are significantly associated with depression.

Remedial steps should be taken to improve the mental health among residents.

Reference

Nair, N., Ng, C.G. & Sulaiman, A.H. (2021) Depressive symptoms in residents of a tertiary training hospital in Malaysia: The prevalence and associated factors. Asian Journal of Psychiatry. doi: 10.1016/j.ajp.2021.102548. Online ahead of print.

The Truth About … Improving Your Mental Health (2021)

Introduction

Professor Tanya Byron and Alex Scott uncover the latest science on how to improve your mental health and wellbeing – and reveal some surprising new techniques.

Part of the BBC’s The Truth About series (you can currently view all episodes on the BBC iPlayer).

Outline

Clinical psychologist Professor Tanya Byron teams up with former England footballer Alex Scott, who has suffered from depression, to discover how the latest science can help us gain greater control over our state of mind and improve our mental health and wellbeing.

Even in normal times, one in four of us will experience mental health difficulties, but living through a global pandemic has put our mental health under unprecedented strain. Over the past year, a team from Imperial College London, in collaboration with the BBC, have surveyed the mental health of over 350,000 people across the UK. This unique study provides a snapshot before and during the pandemic, revealing its shocking impact.

Production & Filming Details

  • Presenter(s): Tanya Byron and Alex Scott.
  • Director(s): Ruhi Hamid.
  • Producer(s):
    • Matthew Barrett … series producer (as Matt Barrett).
    • Tom Coveney … commissioning editor.
    • Fay Finlay … assistant producer.
    • Ruhi Hamid … producer (produced by).
    • Christine Johnston … producer: Cohort.
    • Mairead Maclean … assistant producer.
    • Jane McLaughlin … talent executive.
    • Paul Overton … executive producer.
    • Jacqueline Smith … executive producer.
  • Writer(s): Claudia Lewis (developed by).
  • Music:
  • Cinematography:
  • Editor(s): Clyde Wallbanks and Lauri White.
  • Production:
  • Distributor(s): BBC One.
  • Release Date: 20 January 2021 (UK).
  • Running Time: 57 minutes.
  • Rating: Unknown.
  • Country: US.
  • Language: English.

Video Link

Book: Design for Wellbeing

Book Title:

Design for Wellbeing – An Applied Approach.

Author(s): Ann Petermans and Rebecca Cain (Editors).

Year: 2019.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: Routledge.

Type(s): Hardcover and Kindle.

Synopsis:

Design for Wellbeing charts the development and application of design research to improve the personal and societal wellbeing and happiness of people. It draws together contributions from internationally leading academics and designers to demonstrate the latest thinking and research on the design of products, technologies, environments, services and experiences for wellbeing.

  • Part I starts by conceptualising wellbeing and takes an in-depth look at the rise of the design for wellbeing movement.
  • Part II then goes on to demonstrate design for wellbeing in practice through a broad range of domains from products and environments to services. Among others, we see emerging trends in the design of interiors and urban spaces to support wellbeing, designing to enable and support connectedness and social interaction, and designing for behaviour change to tackle unhealthy eating behaviour in children. Significantly, the body of work on subjective wellbeing, design for happiness, is increasing, and several case studies are provided on this, demonstrating how design can contribute to support the wellbeing of people.
  • Part III provides practical guidance for designing for wellbeing through a range of examples of tools, methods and approaches, which are highly user-centric, participatory, critical and speculative.
  • Finally, the book concludes in Part IV with a look at future challenges for design for wellbeing.

This book provides students, researchers and practitioners with a detailed assessment of design for wellbeing, taking a distinctive global approach to design practice and theory in context. Design for Wellbeing concerns designers and organisations but also defines its broader contribution to society, culture and economy.

What does mental health have to do with well-being?

Research Paper Title

What does mental health have to do with well-being?

Background

Positive mental health involves not the absence of mental disorder but rather the presence of certain mental goods.

Institutions, practitioners, and theorists often identify positive mental health with well-being.

There are strong reasons, however, to keep the concepts of well-being and positive mental health separate.

Someone with high positive mental health can have low well-being, someone with high well-being can have low positive mental health, and well-being and positive mental health sometimes conflict.

But, while positive mental health and well-being are not identical, there is an informative conceptual connection between them.

Positive mental health usually contributes instrumentally to the living of a good human life, where a good human life includes (but is not limited to) well-being.

Reference

Keller, S. (2020) What does mental health have to do with well-being? Bioethics. 34(3), pp.228-234. doi: 10.1111/bioe.12702. Epub 2019 Nov 29.

Book: SNAP Matters

Book Title:

Snap Matters – How Food Stamps Affect Health And Well-Being (Studies in Social Inequality).

Author(s): Judith Bartfield, Craig Gundersen, Timothy Smeeding, and James P. Ziliak (Editors).

Year: 2015.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: Stanford University Press.

Type(s): Hardcover, Paperback, and Kindle.

Synopsis:

In 1963, President Kennedy proposed making permanent a small pilot project called the Food Stamp Programme (FSP). By 2013, the programme’s fiftieth year, more than one in seven Americans received benefits at a cost of nearly $80 billion. Renamed the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programme (SNAP) in 2008, it currently faces sharp political pressure, but the social science research necessary to guide policy is still nascent.

In SNAP Matters, Judith Bartfeld, Craig Gundersen, Timothy M. Smeeding, and James P. Ziliak bring together top scholars to begin asking and answering the questions that matter. For example, what are the antipoverty effects of SNAP? Does SNAP cause obesity? Or does it improve nutrition and health more broadly? To what extent does SNAP work in tandem with other programmes, such as school breakfast and lunch? Overall, the volume concludes that SNAP is highly responsive to macroeconomic pressures and is one of the most effective antipoverty programmes in the safety net, but the volume also encourages policymakers, students, and researchers to continue examining this major pillar of social assistance in America.

What is the Intergenerational Impact of War on Mental Health & Psychosocial Wellbeing?

Research Paper Title

The intergenerational impact of war on mental health and psychosocial wellbeing: lessons from the longitudinal study of war-affected youth in Sierra Leone.

Background

Globally, one in four children lives in a country affected by armed conflict or disaster often accompanied by exposure to a range of adversities including violent trauma and loss. Children involved with armed groups (often referred to as “child soldiers”) typically exhibit high levels of mental health needs linked to their experiences.

The Longitudinal Study of War-Affected Youth (LSWAY) in Sierra Leone is a seventeen-year prospective longitudinal study of the long-term effects of children’s experiences in the country’s eleven-year (1991-2002) civil war on their adult mental health and functioning in addition to exploring the potential mechanisms by which intergenerational transmission of emotional and behavioral disruptions due to war trauma may operate.

LSWAY illuminates how war-related and post-conflict experiences shape long-term adult functioning, family dynamics, and developmental outcomes in offspring

Discussion

The LSWAY study utilises mixed methodologies that incorporate qualitative and quantitative data to unpack risk and protective factors involved in social reintegration, psychosocial adjustment, parenting, and interpersonal relationships.

To date, study findings demonstrate striking levels of persistent mental health problems among former child soldiers as adults with consequences for their families, but also risk and protective patterns that involve family- and community-level factors.

This case study examines the course of LSWAY from inception through implementation and dissemination, including building on the study results to design and evaluate several intervention models.

Conclusions

The case study offers a unique perspective on challenges and field realities of health research in a fragile, post-conflict setting common in the context of humanitarian emergencies.

LSWAY findings along with lessons learned from the field can inform future research as well as intervention research and implementation science to address the mental health and development of war-affected young people.

With four waves of data collection and a planned fifth wave, LSWAY also provides rare insights into the intergenerational effects of humanitarian crises on children, youth, and families across generations.

Reference

Betancourt, T.S., Keegan, K., Farrar, J. & Brennan, R.T. (2020) The intergenerational impact of war on mental health and psychosocial wellbeing: lessons from the longitudinal study of war-affected youth in Sierra Leone. Conflict and Health. 14:62. doi: 10.1186/s13031-020-00308-7. eCollection 2020.

Book: The Wellness Sense

Book Title:

The Wellness Sense – A Practical Guide to your Physical and Emotional Health based on Ayurvedic and Yogic Wisdom.

Author(s): Om Swami.

Year: 2015.

Edition: First (1ed).

Publisher: Black Lotus.

Type(s): Paperback, Audiobook, and Kindle.

Synopsis:

Why do certain foods harm some people and help others? How come the same weight loss program shows different results on different individuals? And, why do some people fall sick more often than others?

Answers to these questions and many more lie in Ayurveda where your body is not just looked upon a holder of flesh and bones but the finest vehicle of experiencing all pleasures and sorrows.

In Ayurveda, as in yoga and tantra, the health of an individual is not just the state of his physical body but an aggregate of the body, senses, mind and soul. Your body is a sacred space, it is the seat of your consciousness.

The Sanskrit word for health is svasthya; it means self-dependence or a sound state of the body and mind. If examined further, it means your natural state; sva means natural and sthya means state or place.

Ayurveda aims to restore your natural state, balance so you may be free of mental and physical afflictions.

More often than not, and certainly in adults, most physical disorders are the result of a repressed and bruised consciousness. Mental afflictions create diseases in the physical body and physical diseases, in turn, disturb the state of mind.

You can treat the disease in the physical body but that’s merely treating the symptom. It is not the permanent solution.

The modern system of medicine is mostly symptom driven. If I have a headache, it’ll tell me to take a pain-killer. Ayurveda does not believe in treating the symptoms. Its advocates understanding the patient and treating the cause of the symptom and not the symptom itself.

In order to do that, the ancient scriptures took a far more holistic approach to health by combining our lifestyle with our natural tendencies (which vary from one person to another). In other words, it understood that one man’s medicine could be another man’s poison.

Expounding on the esoteric aspects of the ancient wisdom, in simple terms, this book shows you how to take care of yourself better and how to lead a healthier life in our present world – a world where we have all the comforts yet we are restless.

We have organic breakfast on the table but no time to eat it, we have the comfiest mattress but little sleep. The key to wholesome living and your well-being is entirely in your hands. This book is a must read for those who are serious about their health.

What Does Mental Health Have to Do With Well-Being?

Research Paper Title

What Does Mental Health Have to Do With Well-Being?

Background

Positive mental health involves not the absence of mental disorder but rather the presence of certain mental goods.

Institutions, practitioners, and theorists often identify positive mental health with well-being.

There are strong reasons, however, to keep the concepts of well-being and positive mental health separate.

Someone with high positive mental health can have low well-being, someone with high well-being can have low positive mental health, and well-being and positive mental health sometimes conflict.

But, while positive mental health and well-being are not identical, there is an informative conceptual connection between them.

Positive mental health usually contributes instrumentally to the living of a good human life, where a good human life includes (but is not limited to) well-being.

Reference

Keller, S. (2020) What Does Mental Health Have to Do With Well-Being? Bioethics. 34(3), pp.228-234. doi: 10.1111/bioe.12702. Epub 2019 Nov 29.

Book: Brian Changer: How Diet can Save your Mental Health

Book Title: Brain Changer: How diet can save your mental health – cutting-edge science from an expert.

Author(s): Professor Felice Jacka.

Year: 2019.

Edition: First.

Publisher: Yellow Kite.

Synopsis:

A combination of Professor Felice Jacka’s love of food and her own experience of depression and anxiety as a young woman led her to question whether what we put in our mouths everyday affects more than our waistline. Felice set out on a journey of discovery to change the status quo and uncover the truth through rigorous science. Beginning her PhD in 2005, she examined the association between women’s diets and their mental health, focusing on depression and anxiety. She soon discovered – you feel how you eat. It is Professor Jacka’s ground-breaking research that has now changed the way we think about mental and brain health in relation to diet.

Brain Changer explains how and why we should consider our food as the basis of our mental and brain health throughout our lives. It includes a selection of recipes and meal plans featuring ingredients beneficial to mental health. It also includes the simple, practical solutions we can use to help prevent mental health problems in the first place and offers strategies for treating these problems if they do arise.

This is not a diet book to help you on the weight scales. This is a guide to good habits to save your brain and to optimise your mental health through what you eat at every stage of life.

Book: Ayurveda 101

Book Title: Ayurveda 101: Ayurveda Basics for The Absolute Beginner [Achieve Natural Health and Well Being through Ayurveda].

Author(s): Advait.

Year: 2016.

Edition: First.

Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Synopsis:

The Ultimate Beginner’s Guide to Ayurveda Have you been searching for proven natural remedies for Achieving Everlasting Health Holistically???

Has your search lead you to Ayurveda??? But, you don’t know where to start and are waiting to be initiated into the Amazing world of Ayurvedic Healing….Then this book is for you.

Discover :: Ayurveda 101 – Ayurveda Basics for The Absolute Beginner This Book will teach you everything you need to know about Ayurveda as a Beginner.

Here’s a sneak peak at the contents of the book; #Origin of Ayurveda #Ashtaanga Veda – The Eight branches of Ayurveda #Panch Maha Bhuta’s – The Five Fundamental Elements #The Three Dosha’s and Your Prakriti – Vata – Pitta – Kapha #The Tri-Dosha test for determining your Prakriti #Sapta-Dhatu – The Seven Body Tissues #Jathar-Agni – The Digestive Fire #Trayodasha Vega – The 13 Natural Urge’s.