Book: Way from Chaos to a Better Life

Book Title:

Way from Chaos to a Better Life: Developing Mental health and Recovering from a Mental Illness: By a Survivor’s Inside-Out Persepctive.

Author(s): Henri Kulm.

Year: 2020.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: Independently Published.

Type(s): Paperback and Kindle.

Synopsis:

My name is Henri. I was born in 1990 in the capital of Estonia, Tallinn and I have lived there my entire life. I have been diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder, mixed type. This means that I must cope with psychotic episodes and mood disturbances (symptoms of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder). I have been struck by the illness more seriously twice: the first blow was, when I was 22 years old, and the second one was, when I was 25 years old. I have gotten my education by finishing a bachelors and master's degree in energetics and now, I work full-timely in that area. I have gotten my training from Tallinn Mental Health Centre and Loov Ruum Koolitused OÜ to be a licensed experience counsellor and I have been involved in the following activities during my work at Tallinn Mental Health Centre: Individual and group counselling, sharing experience story, conducting trainings, representing organization in media. In the training process, I decided to write deeply about my experience recovering from a major mental illness and I want share that with you. Experience counsellor is a person, who has been diagnosed with a mental illness, but has recovered well. He/she can tell his/her experience with the illness from inside and share things, what a psychiatrist or a psychologist might not know. Because the speciality of the sufferers illness is different in every case, the experience counsellor does not give concrete advice, but encourages and supports basing on his/her experience. Despite the risk of possible negative attitudes from society, I wish to publish this book, because after my first psychotic episode and first treatment in the psychiatric hospital, I fell into the zero point of life. It took a lot of time and work to get out of that zero point and now, I can say that I am satisfied with my life. I have been able to live a full life, start and finish a master’s degree, work full timely in my area and be a licensed experience counsellor. I wish to help people with mental illnesses to recover from a mental illness, to re-establish life quality and develop mental health. I wish to show that recovery from a major mental illness is possible. This book might also be useful to people, who are mentally well, but wish to gain more insight of what a mental illness is all about. This book might also be useful to professionals of mental health.

Book: Mental Health Journal: Anxiety and Depression Journal

Book Title:

Mental Health Journal: Anxiety and Depression Journal. Mental Health Journal & Mood Tracker – Thoughts and Feelings Tracker – PTSD and Depression … Goals, Promote Positive Thinking & Gratitude.

Author(s): R. Roslinda.

Year: 2020.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: Independently Published.

Type(s): Paperback.

Synopsis:

This Mental Health Journal & Mood Tracker is designed to help you keep track of your mental and emotional wellbeing. Ideal for anyone struggling with anxiety and mood disorders: depression, ADHD, Bipolar etc. The journal features a 12 monthly daily mood tracker, pages for you to write down your feelings and thoughts. Keep notes on things you are grateful for and your achievements. There are also spaces for you to jot down stuff like, things you did well at today, things that made you smile, things that you had fun doing and enjoyed, things you did that made you feel proud. You can also make notes on goals you want to accomplish.

Features:

  • Mood Tracker For 12 Months: Angry, Ashamed, Confused, Excited….
  • Anxiety Levels Chart-Mood Chart-Section with writing prompts: How do I feel?, Today I am grateful for…, Something I did well today, I felt proud when…
  • and many more!

Major Depressive Disorder: Childhood Trauma

Research Paper Title

Major depressive disorder with childhood trauma: Clinical characteristics, biological mechanism, and therapeutic implications.

Background

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a main type of mood disorder, characterised by significant and lasting depressed mood.

Until now, the pathogenesis of MDD is not clear, but it is certain that biological, psychological, and social factors are involved.

Childhood trauma is considered to be an important factor in the development of this disease.

Previous studies have found that nearly half of the patients with MDD have experienced childhood trauma, and different types of childhood trauma, gender, and age show different effects on this disease.

In addition, the clinical characteristics of MDD patients with childhood trauma are also different, which often have more severe depressive symptoms, higher risk of suicide, and more severe cognitive impairment.

The response to antidepressants is also worse.

In terms of biological mechanisms and marker characteristics, the serotonin transporter gene and the FKBP prolyl isomerase 5 have been shown to play an important role in MDD and childhood trauma.

Moreover, some brain imaging and biomarkers showed specific features, such as changes in gray matter in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, and abnormal changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function.

Reference

Guo, W., Liu, J. & Li, L. (2020) Major depressive disorder with childhood trauma:Clinical characteristics, biological mechanism, and therapeutic implications. Zhong nan da xue xue bao. Journal of Central South University. 45(4), pp.462-468. doi: 10.11817/j.issn.1672-7347.2020.190699.

Book: Learned Hopefulness – The Power of Positivity to Overcome Depression

Book Title:

Learned Hopefulness – The Power of Positivity to Overcome Depression.

Author(s): Dan Tomasulo, PhD.

Year: 2020.

Edition: First (1st).

Publisher: New Harbinger Publications.

Type(s): Paperback and Kindle.

Synopsis:

Cultivate hope with strengths-based practices grounded in positive psychology.

If you suffer from depression, sub-clinical depression, or low mood, you may have days where you feel like you have lost hope – hope that you will ever feel better, that the world will be a better place, or that you will someday find the happiness that always seems to elude you. You are not alone. Many people struggle with feelings of sadness and hopelessness – especially in our difficult, modern world. The good news is that you can change.

Learned Hopefulness offers powerful exercises grounded in evidence-based positive psychology to help you identify your strengths; ditch the self-limiting beliefs that diminish your capacity for positivity; and increase feelings of motivation, resiliency, and wellness. You will also learn to untangle yourself from rumination over past negative events, while shifting your perspective to the present moment and anticipating your future through a more positive lens.

With this unique, compassionate, and life-affirming guide, you will find the tools you need to break free from hopelessness and start living a life of happiness and vitality.

Is There a Mental Health Crisis among Canadian Postsecondary Students?

Research Paper Title

Mental Health among Canadian Postsecondary Students: A Mental Health Crisis?

Background

Recent reports express concerns about a mental health crisis among postsecondary students. These assertions, however, often arise from surveys conducted in postsecondary settings that lack the broader context of a referent group. The objectives of this study were:

  • To assess the mental health status of postsecondary students 18 to 25 years old from 2011 to 2017; and
  • To compare the mental health status of postsecondary students to nonstudents.

Methods

Prevalence was estimated for a set of mental health outcomes using seven annual iterations of the Canadian Community Health Survey (2011 to 2017). Logistic regression was used to derive odds ratio estimates comparing mental health status among postsecondary students and nonstudents, adjusting for age and sex. Random effects metaregression and meta-analyses techniques were used to evaluate trends in prevalence and odds ratio estimates over time.

Results

Over the study period, the prevalence of perceived low mental health, diagnosed mood and anxiety disorders, and past-year mental health consultations increased among female students, whereas binge drinking decreased among male students. With the exception of perceived stress, the odds of experiencing each mental health outcome were lower among postsecondary students compared to nonstudents.

Conclusions

These findings do not support the idea that postsecondary students have worse mental health than nonstudents of similar age. The perception of a crisis may arise from greater help-seeking behaviour, diminishing stigma, or increasing mental health literacy. Regardless, the observance of these trends provide an opportunity to address a previously latent issue.

Reference

Wiens, K., Bhattarai, A., Dores, A., Pedram, P., Williams, J.V.A., Bulloch, A.G.M. & Patten, S.B. (2020) Mental Health among Canadian Postsecondary Students: A Mental Health Crisis? Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 65(1), pp.30-35. doi: 10.1177/0706743719874178. Epub 2019 Sep 4.

Misophonia: Quirk of Human Behaviour or Mental Health Condition?

Introduction

By analogy with misogyny and misanthropy, misophonia ought to mean hatred of noise.

In fact, it is a recent coinage used to label the phenomenon of strong aversive reactions to sounds originating in other people’s oral or nasal cavities, such as chewing, sniffing, slurping, and lip smacking.

A report of a large series of cases seen in the Netherlands suggests that misophonia is well on its way to becoming a new psychiatric disorder (see below) (Jager et al., 2020).

Some commentators have expressed concern at the creeping medicalisation of quirks of human behaviour (BMJ, 2020).

What is Misophonia?

  • It is also known as Selective Sound Sensitivity Syndrome.
  • Misophonia is a disorder in which certain sounds trigger emotional or physiological responses that some might perceive as unreasonable given the circumstance.
  • Those who have misophonia might describe it as when a sound “drives you crazy.”
  • Their reactions can range from anger and annoyance to panic and the need to flee.

Research Paper Title

Misophonia: Phenomenology, comorbidity and demographics in a large sample.

Objective

Analyse a large sample with detailed clinical data of misophonia subjects in order to determine the psychiatric, somatic and psychological nature of the condition.

Methods

This observational study of 779 subjects with suspected misophonia was conducted from January 2013 to May 2017 at the outpatient-clinic of the Amsterdam University Medical Centres, location AMC, the Netherlands. The researchers examined DSM-IV diagnoses, results of somatic examination (general screening and hearing tests), and 17 psychological questionnaires (e.g. SCL-90-R, WHOQoL).

Results

The diagnosis of misophonia was confirmed in 575 of 779 referred subjects (74%). In the sample of misophonia subjects (mean age, 34.17 [SD = 12.22] years; 399 women [69%]), 148 (26%) subjects had comorbid traits of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, 58 (10%) mood disorders, 31 (5%) attention-deficit (hyperactivity) disorder, and 14 (3%) autism spectrum conditions. 2% reported tinnitus and 1% hyperacusis. In a random subgroup of 109 subjects the researchers performed audiometry, and found unilateral hearing loss in 3 of them (3%). Clinical neurological examination and additional blood test showed no abnormalities. Psychological tests revealed perfectionism (97% CPQ>25) and neuroticism (stanine 7 NEO-PI-R). Quality of life was heavily impaired and associated with misophonia severity (rs (184) = -.34 p = < .001, p = < .001).

Limitations

This was a single site study, leading to possible selection–and confirmation bias, since AMC-criteria were used.

Conclusions

This study with 575 subjects is the largest misophonia sample ever described.

Based on these results the researchers propose a set of revised criteria useful to diagnose misophonia as a psychiatric disorder.

References

BMJ 2020;369:m1843.

Jager, I., de Koning, P., Bost, T., Denys, D. & Vulink, N. (2020) Misophonia: Phenomenology, comorbidity and demographics in a large sample. PloS One. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0231390.

Misophonia: Quirk of Human Behaviour or Mental Health Condition?

Introduction

By analogy with misogyny and misanthropy, misophonia ought to mean hatred of noise.

In fact, it is a recent coinage used to label the phenomenon of strong aversive reactions to sounds originating in other people’s oral or nasal cavities, such as chewing, sniffing, slurping, and lip smacking.

A report of a large series of cases seen in the Netherlands suggests that misophonia is well on its way to becoming a new psychiatric disorder (see below) (Jager et al., 2020).

Some commentators have expressed concern at the creeping medicalisation of quirks of human behaviour (BMJ, 2020).

What is Misophonia?

  • It is also known as Selective Sound Sensitivity Syndrome.
  • Misophonia is a disorder in which certain sounds trigger emotional or physiological responses that some might perceive as unreasonable given the circumstance.
  • Those who have misophonia might describe it as when a sound “drives you crazy.”
  • Their reactions can range from anger and annoyance to panic and the need to flee.

Research Paper Title

Misophonia: Phenomenology, comorbidity and demographics in a large sample.

Objective

Analyse a large sample with detailed clinical data of misophonia subjects in order to determine the psychiatric, somatic and psychological nature of the condition.

Methods

This observational study of 779 subjects with suspected misophonia was conducted from January 2013 to May 2017 at the outpatient-clinic of the Amsterdam University Medical Centres, location AMC, the Netherlands. The researchers examined DSM-IV diagnoses, results of somatic examination (general screening and hearing tests), and 17 psychological questionnaires (e.g. SCL-90-R, WHOQoL).

Results

The diagnosis of misophonia was confirmed in 575 of 779 referred subjects (74%). In the sample of misophonia subjects (mean age, 34.17 [SD = 12.22] years; 399 women [69%]), 148 (26%) subjects had comorbid traits of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, 58 (10%) mood disorders, 31 (5%) attention-deficit (hyperactivity) disorder, and 14 (3%) autism spectrum conditions. 2% reported tinnitus and 1% hyperacusis. In a random subgroup of 109 subjects the researchers performed audiometry, and found unilateral hearing loss in 3 of them (3%). Clinical neurological examination and additional blood test showed no abnormalities. Psychological tests revealed perfectionism (97% CPQ>25) and neuroticism (stanine 7 NEO-PI-R). Quality of life was heavily impaired and associated with misophonia severity (rs (184) = -.34 p = < .001, p = < .001).

Limitations

This was a single site study, leading to possible selection–and confirmation bias, since AMC-criteria were used.

Conclusions

This study with 575 subjects is the largest misophonia sample ever described.

Based on these results the researchers propose a set of revised criteria useful to diagnose misophonia as a psychiatric disorder.

References

BMJ 2020;369:m1843.

Jager, I., de Koning, P., Bost, T., Denys, D. & Vulink, N. (2020) Misophonia: Phenomenology, comorbidity and demographics in a large sample. PloS One. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0231390.

Book: Raising Generation Rx

Book Title:

Raising Generation Rx – Mothering Kids with Invisible Disabilities in an Age of Inequality.

Author(s): Linda M. Blum.

Year: 2015.

Edition: First (1ed).

Publisher: American Psychiatric Association Publishing.

Type(s): Hardcover, Paperback and Kindle.

Synopsis:

Recent years have seen an explosion in the number of children diagnosed with “invisible disabilities” such as ADHD, mood and conduct disorders, and high-functioning autism spectrum disorders. Whether they are viewed as biological problems in brain wiring or as results of the increasing medicalisation of childhood, the burden of dealing with the day-to-day trials and complex medical and educational decisions falls almost entirely on mothers. Yet few ask how these mothers make sense of their children’s troubles, and to what extent they feel responsibility or blame. Raising Generation Rx offers a groundbreaking study that situates mothers’ experiences within an age of neuroscientific breakthrough, a high-stakes knowledge-based economy, cutbacks in public services and decent jobs, and increased global competition and racialised class and gender inequality.

Through in-depth interviews, observations of parents’ meetings, and analyses of popular advice, Linda Blum examines the experiences of diverse mothers coping with the challenges of their children’s “invisible disabilities” in the face of daunting social, economic, and political realities. She reveals how mothers in widely varied households learn to advocate for their children in the dense bureaucracies of the educational and medical systems; wrestle with anguishing decisions about the use of psychoactive medications; and live with the inescapable blame and stigma in their communities.

What Impact does Motivational Dispositions have on Mood Symptoms & Emotional Regulation?

Research Paper Title

Psychopathological Correlates and Emotion Regulation as Mediators of Approach and Avoidance Motivation in a Chinese Military Sample.

Background

Approach and avoidance motivation have been thoroughly studied in common mental disorders, which are prevalent in the military context.

Approach/avoidance motivational dispositions underlie emotion responses and are thought to influence emotion dysregulation.

However, studies on the mediating role of emotion regulation (ER) between motivational dispositions and mental disorders have been insufficient.

The researchers examined the psychopathological correlates of motivational dispositions and explored the mediating role of ER.

Methods

The Behavioural Inhibition System and Behavioural Activation System (BIS/BAS) scales and measures of mood disorders (depression, anxiety, OCD, and PTSD) were administered to a nonclinical sample of 3,146 Chinese military service members.

The Emotion Regulation Questionnaire for Army men (ERQ-A) (Chinese version) was used to measure ER styles.

They examined the reliability and construct validity of the BIS/BAS scales.

Approach/avoidance motivations were correlated with symptoms of mood disorders.

Mediation analysis was conducted to confirm the mediating role of ER between motivation and mood disorders.

Results

The results showed acceptable internal reliability and construct validity of the BIS/BAS scales. Gender (female), family status (single-parent family), and social relationships (having fewer good friends) were significant predictors of high BIS sensitivity.

More years of education, an older age, being an only child and being in a single-parent family all significantly predicted high BAS sensitivity.

The BIS/BAS scales were predictive of various DSM-V-based mental disorders (depression, anxiety, OCD, and PTSD).

Immersion exacerbated the impact of BAS/BIS sensitivities on depressive/PTSD symptoms, while reinterpretation and talking out alleviated the impact of BAS/BIS sensitivities on these symptoms.

Conclusions

Motivational dispositions have an impact on mood symptoms under specific conditions.

ER strategies (immersion, reinterpretation, and talking out) were shown to be partial mediators between approach/avoidance motivation and mood disorders.

These findings highlight the importance of ER in altering the impact of motivational dispositions on mood disorders and as a promising target of psychotherapies.

Reference

Wang, X., Zhang, R., Chen, X., Liu, K., Wang, L., Zhang, J., Liu, X. & Feng, Z. (2019) Psychopathological Correlates and Emotion Regulation as Mediators of Approach and Avoidance Motivation in a Chinese Military Sample. Frontiers in Psychiatry. 10:149. doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2019.00149. eCollection 2019.

MedSupport: Patient Perceptions & Perceived Support

Research Paper Title

Enabling patients to cope with psychotropic medication in mental health care: Evaluation and reports of the new inventory MedSupport.

Background

This cross sectional study examined patients’ perceptions of professional support regarding use of psychotropic medication in a specialist mental health care setting.

The aims were to evaluate reliability and validity of the MedSupport inventory, and investigate possible associations between MedSupport scores and patient characteristics.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was performed. The patients completed the MedSupport, a newly developed self-reported 6 item questionnaire on a Likert scale ranged 1 to 5 (1 = strongly disagree to 5 = strongly agree), and the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire.

Diagnosis and treatment information were obtained at the clinical visits and from patient records.

Among the 992 patients recruited, 567 patients (57%) used psychotropic medications, and 514 (91%) of these completed the MedSupport and were included in the study.

Results

The MedSupport showed an adequate internal consistency (Cronbach alpha.87; 95% CI.86-89) and a convergent validity toward the available variables.

The MedSupport mean score was 3.8 (standard deviation.9, median 3.8).

Increasing age and the experience of stronger needs for psychotropic medication were associated with perception of more support to cope with medication, whereas higher concern toward use of psychotropic medication was associated with perception of less support.

Patients diagnosed with behavioural and emotional disorders, onset in childhood and adolescence perceived more support than patients with Mood disorders.

Conclusions

The MedSupport inventory was suitable for assessing the patients’ perceived support from health care service regarding their medication.

Awareness of differences in patients’ perceptions might enable the service to provide special measures for patients who perceive insufficient medication support.

Reference

Drivenes, K., Vederhus, J.K., Haaland, V.Ø., Ruud, T., Hauge, Y.L., Regevik, H., Falk, R.S. & Tanum, L. (2020) Enabling patients to cope with psychotropic medication in mental health care: Evaluation and reports of the new inventory MedSupport. Medicine (Baltimore). 99(1):e18635. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000018635.